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Five Advising Skills Needed When Adopting Artificial Intelligence in Student Services

Five Advising Skills Needed When Adopting Artificial Intelligence in Student Services

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is coming to Higher Ed and it is going to impact several areas of the university, especially student services.  AI will not replace advisors, but it will require tapping into a different skill set.  This is an exciting thing as I believe AI will allow advisors and student support staff to focus on what they love most – transforming students.

Academic Advisors and student support staff are, by nature, motivated to support others succeed. Unfortunately, when you combine student support staff’s increasing caseloads with cumbersome systems it is difficult to have consistent, transforming discussions.  AI is helping solve this problem by taking the hundreds of data points that exist on campus and providing prescriptive insight into what a student requires to succeed.

While there are several emerging solutions that claim the use of Artificial Intelligence, if it is not allowing an advisor to purely focus on the core of why they are advising then it is not true AI for student services.  Here are 5 things advisors, faculty and student support staff can look forward to when their institution adopts student service oriented artificial intelligence:

  1. Student Transformation

AI is no good if it does not provide an advisor with a legible prescription for each student derived from the success and challenges exhibited by your own students.  This prescription should contain both factors that will lead to success as well as risk factors.  The instantaneous insight into students allows an advisor to take a few precious minutes and focus on building strengths while mitigating obstacles.  With vital student information seamlessly integrated within advising tools, the advisor simultaneously advises and transforms.

  1. Confronting Students

Another skill necessary in the age of AI in student services is the ability to confront damaging student behavior.  It’s a vicious cycle in that some student behavior sabotages their success and eats away at confidence and eventually the student drops out.  AI will illuminate these damaging behaviors and a skilled advisor will use the student success factors to build up their confidence to confront and overcome their obstacles (notice a theme here…).  The skill of empowering a student when confronting these damaging behaviors is critical to keeping the student engaged.

  1. Adapting Quickly

It is challenging to be in the business of transforming many lives each day, but it is also what draws advisors to this important job.  We are drowning advisors in student information, sometimes leading to paralysis by analysis.  AI should show the right student information, no more and no less, so advisors can adapt quickly to each student engagement.  This leads me to my next point…

  1. Remain in the Moment

Being present with a student involves active listening.  Cumbersome systems, multitudes of data and jam-packed schedules inhibit active listening.  True student transformation happens when an advisor is fully in the moment with their student focused on what will lead to success and building confidence to navigate through obstacles.  An AI solution should largely eliminate these distractions so an advisor is able to remain in the moment with the student.

  1. Emotional Intelligence

An important trait of an advisor is the ability to read and interpret student emotions.  Emotional intelligence as a skill goes beyond this and a big ingredient is regulation of their own emotions.  Our students live busy, chaotic lives and the ability of the advisor to support a student emotionally while also regulating their own is going to be essential to impacting more students each day.

Artificial Intelligence is not an evolution for student services – it’s a revolution.  It is time to embrace and practice these essential advisor traits that certainly existed previously but were not as prominent.  AI is going to create an ecosystem where advisors flourish doing what they love to do – this can only have incredible impact on their students.

Aviso Retention provides Artificial Intelligence and Predictive Analytics to increase student success and retention.  Click here to learn more.

Great Conference…Now What?

Great Conference…Now What?

If you work in Higher Education, it is fairly plausible you have attended a conference (or considered doing so) in the past few weeks. It seems that “conference season” generally happens between the months of September and November. While there are a few outliers in April and others, a vast majority of sessions happen in this time period.

If your anything like me, conferences can be a bit overwhelming. An endless amount of ideas, and practices are shared. Some you hear and think “yes, we could absolutely mimic that on our campus!” Others seem a far cry of what is plausible considering the resources available. So much information can often paralyze us with indecision. Where do I start? How can I even try this?

When arriving to the conference and hearing the different ideas and fellow campus success stories, we get excited about where our team can go with retention, graduation and student success. Stories of how campuses have created and fostered growth, persistence and graduation rates are encouraging. We are re-charged and refocused, heading back to our perspective campuses ready to tackle the next student crisis with a renewed sense of purpose! The weeks that follow conferences are also met with the same road blocks, lack of budgets and students who just don’t seem to share our passion for their success.

I received great direction from a former Vice President of Student Services I once worked for. She simply said, at the end of each day and the conference in general, write down all your thoughts and everything you have learned. Make a list of 10 actionable items, reviewing the list a few times and narrowing that same list down to three initiatives. Once those three items have been identified, bring those items to me (or a supervisor) and we can develop a plan together in an effort to implement those on campus. This was huge. This did 2 things. Provided a plan of attack for the influx of information and prevented me from getting so overwhelmed and simply doing nothing at all!

This process is also true for the students that we serve. Its exciting to talk about graduation and career plans with students. They get excited too, thinking of all the possibilities ahead of them! However, this is quickly followed by all the work that goes into obtaining a degree or certification and that can be overwhelming.

Similar to the coaching my former Vice President gave to me, it’s critical we acknowledge our students go through this same process. Intrusively advising them through the work that is ahead and how to effectively plan and succeed is critical to their persistence. College and all that encompasses the process is exciting, yet overwhelming. However, if a student has a success coach, academic adviser or faculty member who is able to assist them in breaking down the process into manageable milestones, graduation will inherently follow. Accomplishing a test, class, term and year is a huge success in itself for many of our students. Let’s celebrate and appreciate those milestones and prevent them from feeling the overwhelming thought of the journey ahead.

Now I’m worried about the DRAIN, not the DRIP

Now I’m worried about the DRAIN, not the DRIP

References to “data rich, information poor” (DRIP) syndrome are ubiquitous; a quick Google search returns articles addressing DRIP in numerous disciplines including education, health care, and water quality management. Organizations suffering from DRIP find themselves awash in data—quantifiable facts and statistics—but lacking information—knowledge obtained through analysis of these data.

Universities and colleges are avoiding DRIP by employing data management procedures that result in consumable, aggregated information. These activities may be the responsibility of an internal office, contracted to an external group, or, as I have found useful, assigned to a mix of both internal and external data professionals.

Following the distillation of relevant information through data analytics, institutions must avoid the next hurdle: “data rich, abundant information, non-action” (DRAIN) syndrome. DRAIN occurs when information lies dormant. This syndrome may be the result of a lack of institutional resources to take on a new project, the inability to navigate institutional silos to prompt action, or poor cross-divisional communication channels for sharing information.

A signal that DRAIN is present is the utterance of the phrase “OK, so what?” or “Interesting” after a quick scan of a report. For example, insights about the success factors for student sub-populations are bundled into reports, shared across departments, viewed with mild curiosity, and then filed away without prompting action.

DRAIN is akin to and sometimes accompanied by “paralysis by analysis.” In this situation, the constant quest for the “perfect data point” stymies any project built on the available information. “If we only knew . . .” has halted action and constricted development of relevant programs many times over.

The best remedy for DRAIN is to prepare a plan to leverage information derived from large data sets. The following steps will assist in developing these types of procedures, and discussion on each step will be addressed in future blog posts on DRAIN.

  1. Determine if the information is actionable
  2. Decide how to employ the information
  3. Pilot programs or outreach
  4. Measure the effectiveness of the program
  5. Revise, expand, or retire the program

 

 

 

About the Author:

Nathan Miller, Ph.D. is the Senior Director for Student Success at Columbia College in Columbia, MO. In this role he is responsible for the design, implementation of student success programming for a diverse and geographically disparate student population.