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Is Technology replacing Advising?

Is Technology replacing Advising?

According to MarketWatch, by 2035 there will be 2.7bn students worldwide and in order to meet this demand we would need to build two universities per day over the next 20 years.  Couple this growth with tightening budgets in higher education and cuts have to occur somewhere.  Are you currently experiencing this in student services on your campus?

MarketWatch also indicates that EdTech will be a $252bn industry by 2020.  We can register students without a human interaction.  Students can get career or academic advice through search engines and phone apps.  It’s the Big Bang of EdTech, but if technology slowly replaces advising our retention crisis will only deepen.

Advising through technology with no human contact is largely transactional.  The truth is that many students would still achieve their academic goals with this type of advising.  However, we all know students vary by college and university and a majority of them require an interpersonal connection.

On the surface, computers are unable to replace the value of human interaction.

When you look a little bit deeper, we see that individuals seek out advising and student support roles because they care about people and this is their opportunity to shape the lives of others.

At the core, we have students who are facing new and unique challenges every day and require support from an actual person who is trained to drive their college experience.

The trick is providing technology that allows front-line student support to do their job effectively and efficiently.  Don’t replace technology with advising, rather provide smarter tools so advisors can do what they love.  The question becomes not, “Is technology replacing advising,” rather, “Which technology is ideal for my staff to effectively support students?”

If you value that human interaction on the advising front, then work to align a technology solution with campus culture, student success initiatives and the needs of your students.

Select technology that reflects campus culture.  You can purchase a wide range of data analytic products.  Deciding upon a complex solution without a campus culture to match and you could end up with superfluous data.

Align your student success initiatives with a retention solution.  Technology should mirror the student success initiatives you have or want to put into place.

Align technology with the needs of your students.  Institutions serve different types of students and it’s important to ensure the data that you are gathering and utilizing to engage students is most pertinent to your institution.

Student advising can be incredibly rewarding.  Connecting the dots for a student and working to constantly connect their hard work to the value of a degree and their future is necessary.  These conversations can happen through careful strategy and planning.  In other words, retention technology should allow you the time to think about how you will advance your students rather than trying to figure out who actually needs your support.

Aviso Retention provides analytics, software and expertise to increase student retention and engagement.  Click here to learn more.

How to Select Retention Software

How to Select Retention Software

If you are supporting students in higher ed then you likely could benefit from one of the many solutions currently available.  A great retention solution will do a couple of critical things for student success:

  1. Get the right student information in the right hands at the right time
  2. Eliminate grunt work so your focus is on quality student support

Whether your first-year retention is 90% or 60%, student advising and engagement is vital to the health of a university.  You have a wide range of options to explore.  This article focuses on 5 things that should be on your list when considering a retention solution:

Cost:  The solution you select should more than pay for itself.  Determine a reasonable expectation for an increase in retention (whether its total enrollment, first year retention or a specified sub-population) and ensure the resulting tuition gain is significantly greater than the cost of the software.

Implementation:  I hear about system fatigue a lot.  IT teams are always overloaded.  Faculty needs a break from new system integrations.  Student support staff are comfortable with what the antiquated system they are currently using.  The more complex your solution, the greater impact on resources.  Select a solution that has minimal impact on your IT team and can train your staff in less than a day.

On-going Admin:  The more complex a retention solution the more on-going admin support and maintenance you will need.  When you hire or reallocate a part or full time individual as an on-going administrator, you have to include this in your overall cost.

Type of Partnership: Do you prefer a collaborative partner with higher ed expertise or would you prefer to be left alone with the software?  Many solutions out there will have you pay extra for the “consulting” portion.  A true collaborative partner will be just as invested in supporting the achievement of established retention targets without piling on extra fees.

Features:  It’s going to be hard to find a solution that meets every single one of your needs.  Go for the solution that has your essential components and choose a partner that is nimble enough to build the extra features you need down the road.

There are several options out there to enhance how your faculty and staff engage students.  Include faculty, student support staff and IT in your decision-making process.  They will thank you in the end.

Aviso Retention provides analytics, software and expertise to increase student retention and engagement.  Click here to learn more.

 

Early Intervention- When Knowing My Name Didn’t Matter.

Early Intervention- When Knowing My Name Didn’t Matter.

This past weekend I ran a ½ marathon. This was not my first and I hope will not be my last as my results were less then desirable. I had made a promise to myself that I would run at least one ½ marathon a year, not because I particularly like race day, but training for these races will keep me in somewhat good-ish shape…I tell myself this anyway. All to say, I had trained for this race and was excited for what was ahead. That morning, came with little anxiety however,  as I did not have a running buddy therefore was relying on a carefully picked play list to carry me through. I had also made the decision not to drive the course before-hand, so as to not psych myself out. This would later prove to be one mistake of many that I would make.

So feeling all the feels, I made my second poor decision. Not wanting to run alone, I decided at the last minute to join a pace group. Pace groups are those that are led by wonderful volunteers to ensure you are running at a specific pace so that you might achieve a certain race time. I chose a group that was running at a faster pace than I have ever run a ½ marathon, not by much (I’m not that crazy), but about 40 seconds faster per mile. This may not seem too bad….but at mile 10, it feels like A LOT.

So fast forward and the race begins. I am doing ok with the pace group. Thoughts of “oh man, this is it? I can totally do this”, race through my head. I quickly make friends with the pacers and fellow racers in the group. We each have different stories and very different physical builds, but all share the same goal.  As the race continued, I started to feel the fatigue of running faster than I had ever trained for. I also learned this particular course had the most/steepest hills of any race the area had to offer. I could feel every single one.  At mile 10, I made the last bad decision that would prove to be detrimental to my race efforts. I over-hydrated. I’ll spare you the details of what comes next. All to say, I quickly found myself far behind the pace group and very alone.  I needed to mentally tough it out. I was not in good shape and quickly loosing spirit. The last 2 miles felt as if I was starting from the beginning. Hill after hill, I decided that in order to survive I needed to take a run/walk approach, walking up the last few hills. The mental games were at an all-time high. Then just at the right moment, one of the pacers that I had run with during the first 10 miles, came back on the course to get me. She stayed by my side encouraging me to keep moving forward. This was amazing. Intervention happened when I felt as if I would rather be carted off the course then take one more step. She came to get me at the perfect time and while I am certain she probably doesn’t even know my name, that doesn’t matter. She provided what I needed most. Not water or time checks but just encouragement.

We are at that time in the school year where our students may be starting to lose their excitement for classes and their collegiate journey. The initial “I got this!” has been met with a few less than perfect test scores. The fatigue of everything happening outside of classes is starting to take its toll. Students thought they knew what going to school would take and prepared for the year, yet life circumstances and possibly a few errors in judgment are starting to catch up with them.

This can be hard, student success is what we care about most, but unlike the volunteer that came back for me, she was encouraging one person, while we are trying to encourage hundreds. Not every student will show the need for early intervention, or encouragement. It may simply look like a skipped class, missed appointment or overall lack of engagement. So how do we even attempt to catch all of these behaviors when our caseloads are overwhelming on their own? Its simple. We cant. Not well, anyway. Early intervention, encouragements and alerts only work if staff is working together. A faculty member can record a missed class or lack of engagement, a success coach can record a missed meeting and a financial aid representative can become aware of financial hardship, but unless all of this information is coming together, it becomes very difficult to fully understand how to best serve our students or intervene before it is too late.

A student’s collegiate experience is a marathon not a sprint. Road blocks come in many forms and it can be hard for a success coach or faculty member to manage each student’s hurdles. Yet when we intervene and offer encouragement or work through solutions with our students at the right time, the results can not only affect our overall retention but can be life-changing for the students that we work with.

Renew, Refocus, Revitalize…Retention

Renew, Refocus, Revitalize…Retention

As the saying goes, the only thing constant is change. While this continues to be true, we can also appreciate when things stay the same. As long as those “things” are adding to our lives in a positive way.  When change does happen, it is often given a title that typically has  “re” at the beginning. Essentially, we are revisiting the way we have once done something and changing it.

With this in mind the main focus of our team at Aviso Coaching continues to be the success of our partner institutions. This will remain the same, as we lead college and universities through renewing their team’s energy, refocusing their efforts into a unified early alert software system and revitalizing student success and degree completion on their campus. We encourage campuses to change daily, even in the smallest ways to best meet the needs of their student populations. Sometimes these are easy changes, while others take time and effort to incorporate. All the while we ensure each team is fully supported.  This is our story. We are passionate about student success and retention and remain firmly focused on these initiatives.

So while our team continues to support and encourage our partnering campuses to adjust when needed, we must do the same. Therefore, we have decided to move forward with a few key modifications.

First, we wanted to make sure we were telling our story in a way that portrayed who we are and where Aviso is going. Therefore, Aviso Coaching is now Aviso Retention. Why? We have grown quite a bit in the last few years, but the laser focus on retention, student success and degree completion remains the same. We feel that Aviso Retention better captures the overall impact of our solution and the value of our partnership.

Second, while we encourage our partnering campuses to stay on the forefront of innovation and student retention, we as the Aviso team need to do the same. Therefore, we have revitalized our logo to reflect this forward movement. The transition has already begun and will continue throughout the next few months.

The success of our partners and the students they serve continues to be our priority. We are thrilled to be transitioning to Aviso Retention and excited for the years to come. Cheers to continued quality and exciting innovation!

Please take time to check out our new website: Avisoretention.com

Follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter to keep up with the new and exciting things happening with our team!

Contact Us to learn more about our student centered retention initiatives!

Now I’m worried about the DRAIN, not the DRIP

Now I’m worried about the DRAIN, not the DRIP

References to “data rich, information poor” (DRIP) syndrome are ubiquitous; a quick Google search returns articles addressing DRIP in numerous disciplines including education, health care, and water quality management. Organizations suffering from DRIP find themselves awash in data—quantifiable facts and statistics—but lacking information—knowledge obtained through analysis of these data.

Universities and colleges are avoiding DRIP by employing data management procedures that result in consumable, aggregated information. These activities may be the responsibility of an internal office, contracted to an external group, or, as I have found useful, assigned to a mix of both internal and external data professionals.

Following the distillation of relevant information through data analytics, institutions must avoid the next hurdle: “data rich, abundant information, non-action” (DRAIN) syndrome. DRAIN occurs when information lies dormant. This syndrome may be the result of a lack of institutional resources to take on a new project, the inability to navigate institutional silos to prompt action, or poor cross-divisional communication channels for sharing information.

A signal that DRAIN is present is the utterance of the phrase “OK, so what?” or “Interesting” after a quick scan of a report. For example, insights about the success factors for student sub-populations are bundled into reports, shared across departments, viewed with mild curiosity, and then filed away without prompting action.

DRAIN is akin to and sometimes accompanied by “paralysis by analysis.” In this situation, the constant quest for the “perfect data point” stymies any project built on the available information. “If we only knew . . .” has halted action and constricted development of relevant programs many times over.

The best remedy for DRAIN is to prepare a plan to leverage information derived from large data sets. The following steps will assist in developing these types of procedures, and discussion on each step will be addressed in future blog posts on DRAIN.

  1. Determine if the information is actionable
  2. Decide how to employ the information
  3. Pilot programs or outreach
  4. Measure the effectiveness of the program
  5. Revise, expand, or retire the program

 

 

 

About the Author:

Nathan Miller, Ph.D. is the Senior Director for Student Success at Columbia College in Columbia, MO. In this role he is responsible for the design, implementation of student success programming for a diverse and geographically disparate student population.